Marine Spatial Planning

Marine ecosystems are under pressure, and in the rush to safeguard our oceans, conservationists are pinning their hopes on marine protected areas (MPAs), with the aim of meeting a diverse set of conservation, social and economic objectives, including the management of marine resources. A current focus of my research involves investigating the trade-offs in MPA design to help inform marine spatial planning efforts by identifying potential conflicts and by designing new regulations that better balance conservation objectives and stakeholder interests.

_________

Metcalfe, K. Bréheret, N., Chauvet, E., Collins, T., Curran, B.K., Parnell, R.J., Turner, R.A., Witt, M.J. & Godley, B.J. (2018) Using satellite AIS to improve our understanding of shipping and fill gaps in ocean observation data to support marine spatial planning. Journal of Applied Ecology. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.13139

Metcalfe, K., Vaughan, G., Vaz, S. & Smith, R.J. (2015) Spatial, socio-economic and ecological implications of incorporating minimum size constraints in marine protected area network design. Conservation Biology, 29(6), 1615-1625. DOI: 10.1111/cobi.12571

Metcalfe, K., Vaz, S. Engelhard, G.H., Villanueva, M.C., Smith, R.J. & Mackinson, S. (2015) Evaluating conservation and fisheries management strategies by linking spatial prioritisation software and ecosystem and fisheries modelling tools. Journal of Applied Ecology, 52 (3), 665-674. DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.12404

Delavenne, J., Metcalfe, K., Smith R.J., Vaz, S., Martin, C.S., Dupuis, L., Coppin, F. & Carpentier, A. (2012) Systematic conservation planning in the eastern English Channel: comparing the Marxan and Zonation decision support tools. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 69 (1): 75 – 83. DOI: 10.1093/icesjms/fsr180

 
Coastal and nearshore waters of the Island of Príncipe in São Tomé and Príncipe. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe

Coastal and nearshore waters of the Island of Príncipe in São Tomé and Príncipe. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe

An olive ridley sea turtle ( Lepidochelys olivacea ) with satellite tag attached, that has recently been  tracked  from a nesting beach in Gabon. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe

An olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) with satellite tag attached, that has recently been tracked from a nesting beach in Gabon. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe

Marine Turtles

The management of widely dispersed marine vertebrates can be facilitated by better understanding their distribution, density, population trends and threats at local and regional scales. Unfortunately, for some populations of marine turtle spatial and temporal data are often lacking, particularly along the Atlantic coast of Africa, a region which is considered globally important. A current focus of my research involves both generating population estimates for rookeries in Central Africa (Gabon and the Republic of Congo) and developing a better understanding of at sea movements to facilitate more effective marine spatial planning efforts.

_________

Metcalfe, K. et al., (2015) Going the extra mile: Ground-based monitoring of olive ridley turtles reveals Gabon hosts the largest rookery in the Atlantic. Biological Conservation. 190 (8), 14-22. DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2015.05.008

Pikesley, S.K., Agamboue, P.D., Asseko, G.M., Bayet, J.P., Bibang, J.N., Bonguno, E.A., Boussamba, F., Broderick, A.C., Coyne, M., Faure, F.E., Fay, J.M., Formia, A., Godley, B.J., Gnandji, M.S., Kema Kema, J.R., Mabert, B.D.K., Manfoumbi, J.C., Metcalfe, K., Minton, G., Nelms, S., Nzegoue, J., Ogandanga, C., Olwina, C.K.K., Otsagha, F., Parnell, R.J., du Plessis, P., Ngouessono, S., Sounguet, G.-P., Wada, M. & White, L., Witt, M.J. (2018) A novel approach to estimate the distribution, density and at-sea risks of a centrally-placed mobile marine vertebrate. Biological Conservation. 221, 246 - 256. DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2018.03.011

 

Small-Scale Fisheries

Coastal and marine ecosystems contribute to the livelihoods and well-being of 10% of the world’s population, and so are home to a diverse range of fishing fleets, ranging from small-scale artisanal or inshore fisheries to large-scale industrial fleets, all of which employ a broad range of fishing gears and practices. In many developing countries, small-scale fisheries are the mainstay of the fisheries sector, however, despite their size and important contribution detailed information on small-scale fisheries at a country level is very rare, particularly in Central Africa. In light of the increasing application of marine spatial planning my research focuses on understanding spatial patterns of resource use and dependency to ensure that small-scale fishers are not marginalised from decisions that could affect access to fisheries resources.

_________

Metcalfe, K., Collins, T., Abernethy, K.E., Boumba, R., Dengui, J.C., Miyalou, R., Parnell, R.J., Plummer, K.E., Russell, D.J.F., Safou, G.K., Tilley, D., Turner, R.A., Vanleeuwe, H., Witt, M.J., & Godley, B.J. (2017) Addressing uncertainty in marine resource management; combining communit engagement and tracking technology to characterise human behavior. Conservation Letters. 10 (4), 460-469.

Typical small-scale fishing boat (pirogue) employed by fishers in Conkouati-Douli National Park in the Republic of Congo. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe

Typical small-scale fishing boat (pirogue) employed by fishers in Conkouati-Douli National Park in the Republic of Congo. Photo: Kristian Metcalfe